Photo and Camera Collections to visit


TheFirefly

The Firefly  photogravure by George Henry Seeley, 1907   Courtesy the Clark Institute

Last year, or maybe the year before that, I put together a list of Photo Collections around New England, most of which are on the list because you can actually go and visit them. Take a look, take a drive and visit one or two.

At almost the same time, PHSNE member Dave DeJean put together lists that are broader than mine, in focus and in geography. These are worth a visit as well, but you may have to put your travlin’ shoes on for some of them.

Just sayin’. It’s almost a new year and all and it’s time to get out there and look at things.

argus-c44-lineup_600

From a camera museum done right: three generations of Argus C4s — the original C4, the C4, with advance lever and rewind crank, and the C44R, with bayonet mount, surrounded by display labels and additional printed materials, from the Argus Museum in Ann Arbor, MI.

Large format lens questions?

biogon

Those of us who still enjoy taking out the big, old, film cameras of yesteryear sometime get in a bind when contemplating an expansion of our choice of lenses. Most of the ones I can afford don’t come with any instructions and aren’t sold at camera stores (remember them?). I find mine at flea markets, attached to broken gear and, of course, at Photographica, twice a year. This is a list of information sources posted and maintained by Dan Fromm, a photographer who often gives very good advice on APUG.org (a site I frequent and really enjoy). If you come across an old lens at the Photographica show or anyplace else and just can’t resist it, find out what you need to know by going to one of the sites on this list.

I’ve also found the following links really helpful:

http://www.allenrumme.com/lensdb/DBIntro-1.html

http://www.arnecroell.com/voigtlaender.pdf

http://www.brucebarrett.com/large_format/LF_Lens_Coverage.html